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Reblogged from thalassophilouswitch  4 notes

thalassophilouswitch:

Like the song is supposed to be “wow I miss you so much” but what it really conveys is this sense of begrudging someone for moving on faster than you.

And that’s like really really dumb, people move on from relationships at different rates.

It doesn’t mean it meant any less to them, it doesn’t invalidate how you feel, people just process emotions differently.

Like

Just be happy for the time you spent together, be happy you were in one another’s lives, don’t sit there and obsess over how thy’ere with someone else.

If you really loved them you’d put their happiness first, you can’t make them stay in love with you.

Ya feel??

Reblogged from wordsnquotes  292 notes
wordsnquotes:

BOOK OF THE DAY: 
The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman
Neil Gaiman’s modern fairy tale has the ultimate beautifully, haunting recipe for success. Written for an adult audience, Gaiman thrives on recapturing the essence of childhood imagination in an elegant, enchanting but dark matter. The novel begins with a middle-aged man returning to his childhood home in Sussex, England for a funeral. He remembers his childhood friend, eleven year-old, Lettie Hempstock, and her grandmother and mother. 
At the tender age of seven, the narrator is sucked into the world of magic, which he recalls at the age of forty when he reaches the pond, which Lettie and him used to call the ocean. As a child, from your perspective everything is huge. His ocean is now a pond, your gigantic uncle is now shorter than you, and your king size bed can only fit your legs. You learn the adult themes of imperfection and survival and the detrimental fact that your parents are far from perfect. This is exactly the type of nostolgia Gaiman springs on us. 

 Childhood memories are sometimes covered and obscured beneath the things that come later, like childhood toys forgotten at the bottom of a crammed adult closet, but they are never lost for good.

The story begins with the dark memory of a suicide unleashing a world of magic. Like all good fairy tales, there is a monster, his nanny Urusula Monkton. But there is a catch, this seven year-old boy is the only one who can see her true facade. Ursula has charmed his entire family and his only save haven is with Lettie, at the end of the lane and her guardians. The Hempstock farmhouse is the portal for other worlds. This dark magical world leads him into his quest of survival and eternal fear. 
Read excerpts from the novel here! Get the book here!
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wordsnquotes:

BOOK OF THE DAY:

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman’s modern fairy tale has the ultimate beautifully, haunting recipe for success. Written for an adult audience, Gaiman thrives on recapturing the essence of childhood imagination in an elegant, enchanting but dark matter. The novel begins with a middle-aged man returning to his childhood home in Sussex, England for a funeral. He remembers his childhood friend, eleven year-old, Lettie Hempstock, and her grandmother and mother. 

At the tender age of seven, the narrator is sucked into the world of magic, which he recalls at the age of forty when he reaches the pond, which Lettie and him used to call the ocean. As a child, from your perspective everything is huge. His ocean is now a pond, your gigantic uncle is now shorter than you, and your king size bed can only fit your legs. You learn the adult themes of imperfection and survival and the detrimental fact that your parents are far from perfect. This is exactly the type of nostolgia Gaiman springs on us. 

 Childhood memories are sometimes covered and obscured beneath the things that come later, like childhood toys forgotten at the bottom of a crammed adult closet, but they are never lost for good.

The story begins with the dark memory of a suicide unleashing a world of magic. Like all good fairy tales, there is a monster, his nanny Urusula Monkton. But there is a catch, this seven year-old boy is the only one who can see her true facade. Ursula has charmed his entire family and his only save haven is with Lettie, at the end of the lane and her guardians. The Hempstock farmhouse is the portal for other worlds. This dark magical world leads him into his quest of survival and eternal fear. 

Read excerpts from the novel here! Get the book here!

Facebook  | Instagram |  Twitter |  Pinterest